Church Review Notes October 2019

The Parish of Saint Catherine & Saint James with Saint Audoen
Canon Mark Gardner Tel: 01 454 2274 Mobile 087 266 0228
Email: markgardner@eircom.net
Diocesan Lay Reader: James Kilbey
Review Distribution: Margery Bell Tel: 01 4542067
Website: cja.dublin.anglican.org
Organist: Harry Meehan

Service times every Sunday
10.00 Eucharist, St Audoen, Cornmarket (Parking in Francis Street is free on Sundays).
11.30 Eucharist, St Catherine & St James, Donore Avenue.

Sunday 13 October Family Service, with thanksgiving for the blessings of harvest; followed by tea and coffee.

Sunday 10 November Family Service, with an act of remembrance, followed by tea and coffee.

Sunday 15 December Carol Service, and mince pies.

Holy Baptism
At the Church of St Catherine & St James, on Sunday 15 September, ‘Rosie’, Rosalyn Carmel Comerford, daughter of Brendan Comerford and Joanne Mathews of Brookfield Street, Dublin 8. Rosie’s Godparents are Paul Matthews and Gwendoline Mathews. ‘And the child grew in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man.’

Psalter online
The Church Music Committee has on its website under the heading of ‘Useful Reading’ some references to both old and new versions of the Psalms. I have much affection for the ‘Coverdale’ Psalter (which may be largely Tyndale) and I had an old Irish Church Psalter digitised. In PDF form it has been added to the end of the web page quoted below.
‘The iconic translation of the Psalter by Myles Coverdale in the Great Bible of 1539-41 was used in all editions of the Book of Common Prayer ….’
‘The Church of Ireland 1926 edition of the Prayer Book adopted a (very conservative) revision of Coverdale. The current 2004 Prayer Book uses a modern translation, as is more fully described on the Psalms Online page.’
‘The translation of the psalter in the 1926 Prayer Book continues to be used in the larger cathedrals and some parish churches. In 1930 the Association for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Dublin published the psalms and canticles arranged for chanting. Entitled ‘Irish Church Psalter’, this meticulously produced book was used by churches large and small throughout Ireland.’
I also have the Irish Chant Book in digitised form but it’s a bit too big for ease of use! Maybe some reader of the Review will tell me how. The pointed Psalter (which I had digitised) may be found here www.churchmusicdublin.org/wp-content/uploads/Irish-Church-Psalter.pdf’

St Audoen’s tower
Work has commenced on the remaining two sides of the tower to be repointed, and the length of time it will take, estimated at six months, will be dependent on the weather. The Church perimeter is surrounded by a palisade now and access to the building site is through St Audoens Gate. The park remains open and the OPW Visitor Centre will also remain open until December. The Church may be reached via the Visitor Centre.

Archbishop’s foreword
It comes as a surprise to me to realise that I have been editing the Diocesan Cycle of Prayer for twenty years, having taken it over from Paul Colton, when he moved from Castleknock to be Bishop of Cork. The Archbishop has written some very kind words in the foreword of the 2019-2020 cycle.
‘Through this Diocesan Cycle of Prayer, we are given the chance to pray to, pray for, pray with. The preposition is every bit as important as the verb. We pray to God the Trinity in all the personal diversity of that Trinity, conscious of relationship and individualism, conscious too of the loyalty of eternal connection. Through this we are made aware of our responsibility today in the care of creation. We pray for others and for ourselves. This is more enriching of us than it looks at first sight. It is we ourselves who pray with good intention for others. It is we ourselves who pray for ourselves along with others who are different from us. Too often we omit to pray for ourselves. We pray with those who are present and with those who are absent. Such absence takes many forms, whether it be because of place or time, life or death. God draws in and shares out once again the good intention and the good faith of God’s praying people.
It is always a delight and a duty to have the Diocese of Jerusalem feature in our Cycle as we feature in their Cycle. They are special partners in prayer and heralds of hope. Our link with them gives depth and urgency to our conversations with God.
I thank, on behalf of all of us, the Reverend Canon Mark Gardner for his careful work of preparation and editing. I commend to you this publication and pray that in using it you will enjoy the sense of inclusion God gives to all God’s children, through prayer and intercession. +Michael
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