Church Review Notes October 2015

The Parish of Saint Catherine & Saint James with Saint Audoen
Canon Mark Gardner (Editor) Tel: 01 454 2274 Mobile 087 266 0228
The Revd Martha Waller (Curate-Assistant) Tel: 01 868 1655
Email: markgardner300@gmail.com
Review Distribution: Doris Brooks Tel: 01 453 0887
Website: cja.dublin.anglican.org

Service times every Sunday
10.00 Eucharist, St Audoen, Cornmarket. (Parking in Francis Street is free on Sundays)
11.30 Eucharist (and Sunday School, in term time) St Catherine & St James, Donore Avenue. (Family Service and Church Coffee, Second Sundays)

First Wednesday of the Month
10.30 Service of Wholeness and Healing, with Laying-on of Hands and Anointing.

11.30 Sunday 18 October, St Luke the Evangelist, St Catherine & St James, Donore Avenue, Service of Wholeness and Healing, with Laying-on of Hands and Anointing.

Holy Baptism
At St Catherine & St James’ Church, Saturday 19 September, Emma Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Oakley and Helen Murray of Sandford Park in this Parish.

Sunday School
Family service with the children of the Sunday School resumed in September, with the children gathering on the chancel steps to sing ‘He’s got the whole world in his hands’. Taller children read the readings and some very small ones took up the collection, with some help! Child-friendly songs and prayers, and a children’s address by the Revd Martha Waller, gave the new term an excellent start. Grateful thanks to the many volunteers who have offered to help with Sunday School, who will meet again on Saturday morning 31 October in the Church, followed by a statutory meeting of the Safeguarding Trust panel.
Family service will coincide with Harvest Thanksgiving on Sunday 11 October, and in November will move to Sunday 22, Christ the King.

Remembrance Sunday
The Archbishop will visit the Parish on Sunday 8 November to dedicate the War Memorial from St Matthias’ Church now transferred to St Audoen’s from Christ Church Leeson Park, by kind permission, and the War Memorial from St Peter’s Aungier St which has been reassembled and restored, and placed in the Baptistery of St Catherine and St James’ Church, along with a memorial to Elizabeth Fryer, a Deaconess in St Peter’s Parish, who died in 1927. I think it’s fair to say that these last two memorials have been lost to view for forty years.

Harvest Gathering
This is the title of the fundraising evening event at St Audoen’s (advertised elsewhere) in aid of Merchant’s Quay Night Café for the homeless, at which their CEO Tony Geoghegan will speak, to encourage people to contribute to a charity collection. Harvest Thanksgiving will celebrated on Sunday morning 18 October. Many thanks to John’s Lane Church choir for their music-making. The Revd Martha Waller continues to collect useful things for the people attending the Night Café, towels, toothbrushes and toothpaste, soap and shampoo, which people bring to Church in a bag and leave by the font.

The Office of Public Works
The OPW Visitor Centre has so far had a very good season which sadly comes to an end on Wednesday 21 October. We very much value the relationship the Parish has with them, and the care they care they take of the Church, keeping it open to the public every day, and maintaining an atmosphere of peace and quiet in it, while encouraging visitors to notice its historic features and to contribute to the donations box for the Parish.

Music at St Audoen’s
Dr Stuart Kinsella’s choir Peregryne sang Evensong in St Audoen’s on Wednesday 19 August. The music, unusually, included two works sung in Irish: the responses: ‘Freagraí le h-aghaidh Urnaí na Nóna’, and the canticles: ‘Cainticí Mhuire agus Shimeoin’, both by Caitríona Ní Dhubhghaill (1975-). The anthem, ‘Gaude flore virginali’ was taken from the Eton choirbook and is by Hugh Kellyk (fl. c.1480) who is known to have composed only one other work, a five-voice, Magnificat. The unusual orthography of his surname does suggest that it is the Irish name, ‘Ceallaigh’.

Developments in St Luke’s Parish
Planning permission has been granted for a €41 million 400-bedroom student housing complex near St Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin. The development, which also includes shops, restaurants, cafes and a gym, is to be built on a 2.5-acre site on Mill Street, Newmarket, in the southwest inner city. The approved plans for Mill Street, which will be built over five blocks, was passed by An Bord Pleanála earlier this week.
The site is being developed in a partnership between Global Student Accommodation (GSA) Group and the property investment and management company The Creedon Group. GSA is to fund and develop the student accommodation and, once completed, will operate it under the brand name Uninest.
GSA said it expects 150 new jobs to be created during the construction phase with a further 15 full-time positions coming onstream once the development opens in September 2017.Details of the complex were first revealed in The Irish Times in October 2014.
Most of the existing buildings on the site are former industrial premises and will be cleared prior to construction. However, a derelict pre-Georgian townhouse at 10 Mill Street, one of the last remaining “Dutch Billy” style 17th century houses in Dublin, will be restored and reused as part of the development. On completion, the scheme will be known as Uninest Mill Street.
GSA said archaeological work has already started on the site with a number of historic tanning pits having been discovered. The company has committed to retain artefacts, offer them to local museums and display others in publicly accessible areas.
“We aim to make a real difference to our student residents’ lives providing a great student living experience which helps students study, live well and get the most from their time at university,” said Aaron Bailey, development and project manager for GSA Dublin.
GSA already runs purpose-built schemes in London, Dubai, Tokyo, China and Australia, but the Mill Street development will be its first in Dublin. The company says it intends to invest some €250 million in the capital in the next five years.
Charlie Taylor

This entry was posted in Review Notes. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply